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Bird Life

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Ness House is situated just to the north of Thorpeness. Thorpeness itself is almost a miniature headland and as such is a recognised spot for observing migration in Suffolk with many scarce and rare species being found. The cliff top at Thorpeness and Ness House provides an ideal vantage point for sea-watching.

 

The immediate countryside surrounding Ness House comprises heathland, woodland, farmland and coastal scrub. In addition, the reserves of Minsmere and North Warren are just a few miles to the north and south of Ness House.

The lists overleaf are a record of a species seen between Thorpeness Common and Dover House, including the heathland area known as Aldringham Walks, all within 20 minutes walking from Ness House. The classification of species (rare, common etc.) is based on sightings for the sea area; a species may be for example very rare at Ness House but very common in Suffolk – Coot being a good example!

All the photographs shown are displays from “the Ogilvie Collection of British Birds” at the Ipswich Museum.

The species listed below are occasional, common and very common migrants / visitors to the area. They can often be seen during a visit to Ness House and its surrounding habitats.

Blackbird

Blackcap

Brambling

Bullfinch

Chaffinch

Chiffchaff

Crossbill

Crow

Curlew

Collared Dove

Coat Tit

Blue Tit

Goldfinch

Greenfinch

Jay

Kestrel

Song thrush

Green woodpecker

Fieldfare

Grey Heron

Great tit

Long tailed Tit

Linnet

House Sparrow

Dunnock

Yellow Wagtail

Grey Wagtail

Magpie

Nightingale

Nightjar

Mistle Thrush

Snipe

Pied Wagtail

Meadow Pipit

Pheasant

Grey Partridge

Red Throated Diver

Black Throated Diver

Redwing

Robin

Rook

Reed Bunting

Pied Flycather

Marsh Harrier

House Martin

Snow Martin

Snow Bunting

Swift

Sand Martin

Stonechat

Sparrowhawk

Swallow

Little Owl

Short-eared Owl

Tawny Owl

Twite

Tree Pipit

Whinchat

Woodpigeon

Woodlark

Wheatear

Willow Warbler

Whimbrel

Wren

Yellowhammer

Woodcock

Cormorant

Feral Pigeon

Stock Dove

Truetle Dove

Cuckoo

Long-eared Owl

Great Spotted Woodpecker

Skylark

Black Redstart

Redstart

Siskin

Ring Ouzel

Black Headed Gull

Brent Goose

Canada Goose

Mallard

Common tern

Lapwing

Mute swan

Shelduck

Fulmar

Great Black-backed gull

Herring gull

Razorbill

Razorbill

Artic Tern

Guillemot

Red-breasted Merganser

Common Gull

Gannet

Little Tern

Oystercatcher

Wigeon

Red-necked Grebe

Great-crested grebe

Cory’s Shearwater

Sooty Shearwater

Spoonbill

Little Egret

Gadwall

Pintail

Shoveler

Pochard

Tufted Duck

Scaup

Eider

Velvet Scoter

Goldeneye

Buzzard

Osprey

Moorhen

Merlin

Hobby

Peregrine

Red-legged Partridge

Avocet

Ringed Plover

Golden Plover

Grey Plover

Sanderling

Knot

Purple Sandpiper

Dunlin

Black-tailed godwit

Turnstone

Redshank

Greenshank

Great Skua

Mediterranean Gull

Little Gull

Lesser Black-backed Gull

Iceland Gull

Glaucous Gull

Kittiwake

Sandwich Tern

Black Tern

Little Auk

Sedge Warbler

Reed Warbler

Dartford Warbler

Lesser Whitethroat Whitethroat

Garden Warbler

Spotted Flycatcher

Goldcrest

Firecrest

Jackdaw

Starling

Redpoll

These species are rare and not likely to be seen by visitors

Red-backed Shrike

Bewick’s Swan

Bean Goose

Pink Footed Goose

Great Grey Shrike

Brent Goose

Spotted flycatcher

Tree sparrow

Osprey

Hawfinch

Honey Buzzard

Lesser Spotted Woodpecker

Great Northern Diver

Dotterel

Slavonian Grebe

Wood Warbler

Goosander

Red Kite

Ruff

Spotted Redshank

Green Sandpiper

Long-tailed Skua

Waxwing

Icterine Warbler

Pallas’s warbler

Bearded Tit

Lapland Bunting

Corn Bunting

These species are extremely rare, with less than five sightings in the last five years

Little Grebe

Leach’s Petrel

Bulwer’s Petrel

Black Kite

Quail

Coot

Stone Curlew

Sabine’s Cull

Black Guillemot

Bee-eater

Hoopoe

Wryneck

Richard’s Pipit

Marsh Warbler

Radde’s Warbler

Red-eyed Vireo

Artic Redpoll

Although we try and avoid some of the publicity and over-excitement that birdwatchers sometimes cause, we do hope that you will tell us if you see anything special during your stay, and we are always most happy to talk to you about the birds in this area, as they change with the seasons.

Got a question? Get in touch.

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